10 comments

  1. Fantastic read! I loved hearing about the people involved in the behind-the-scenes action of THE OFFICE. Can I get a job there? Please? :)

  2. That was an absolutely fascinating article. Dean and Dave are truly gifted at what they do (40-60 hours’ worth of footage per episode?! WOW!). They are such a major part of the magic that is The Office, and as a fan, I’m eternally grateful for all their hard work. :)

  3. Fascinating! I always wondered what the process was like. This really enhances my viewing pleasure. :)

  4. Excellent article! Most of the time I’m thinking about the writing and don’t give a thought to the editing, but it has so much to do with the feel of the show.

    I thought this part was awesome:
    “It’s this rhythm where you just know when to cut. 10 frames more or 10 frames less can kill it.”
    I know exactly what he’s talking about there, and it’s details like that that make The Office more than great television.

  5. It’s amazing how you can be obsessed with a show and not even think about the editing that goes into making each episode so genius. Great article and kudos to Dean and Dave for their great… scratch that, fantastic (underlined and bold font) work. Especially interested with how they pick out those great reaction scenes. Who’d have thunk it!

  6. Everyone always talks about the writers, but this article really made me realize how the editing is such a huge factor in whether or not the show works. I have so much respect for these guys. What huge undertaking they have.

  7. I am really curious as to which episode had the reaction pass from a different episode, and the special effects altered shirt!? Hmmm….

  8. Wow, thank you for sharing that, tanster! I am an aspiring television/film editor and I love reading stories about editors and their shows… so this article is pretty much IT for me, haha. Although I love The Office, I wouldn’t want to be an editor for it — since it’s my favorite show, I would want to be able to watch it without knowing the story and seeing the other 59.65 hours worth of footage that wasn’t used.

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